Peermaster Modes
NOTE I will NOT post the software loading process. It's TOO damn big. If you want a copy of the Peermaster Installation PDF, email ME

NOT FINISHED! Don't tell me about the missing example for VNET configs...

Choosing a Mode of Operation
  Important! Before you begin installation of your adapter, you must choose a mode of operation.
Note:  Do not attach more than one Quad-B2 PeerMaster 10Base2 port to the same 10Base2 network segment.
   You may configure your Quad-BT or -B2 PeerMaster adapter to operate in either of two modes: the Traditional Adapter mode or VNET Switch mode. Use the Traditional Adapter mode when you expect little or no cross-subnetwork traffic. (Subnetwork is also called  subnet.) Use the VNET Switch mode when you need to build subnets to provide cross-segment traffic. Choose the mode of operation and configuration that fits the needs of your network. Both modes of operation are described in this section; examples of configurations begin on page 5.



Traditional Adapter Mode
   When the adapter is functioning in this mode, the drivers for your adapter register each individual LAN segment with the network operating system (NOS) as a unique subnet. Thus, your NOS views your adapter as four separate adapters. Therefore, you must configure each network segment with a unique network number.
     All cross-subnet traffic must be routed. Routing may be performed internally by the server itself, or externally by a local router. Internal routing is the least expensive alternative, but impairs server responsiveness by involving the server in frame forwarding. External routers provide high-performance frame forwarding without impacting the server. However, they are cumbersome, expensive, and difficult to configure and manage.

Guidelines for using the Traditional Adapter mode:
Do not externally join (using bridges, switches, or concentrators) ports of adapters.
The adapter places no limit on the number of nodes per port. 
Ensure that each port is bound to the protocol with a unique network number.



VNET Switch Mode
  When the adapter is operating in this mode, multiple LAN segments are registered with the NOS as a single subnet, called a  VNET. VNETs are multisegment virtual subnets.
   VNETs are made possible by a layer of virtual network software that binds to multiple instances of the adapter LAN driver and registers them with the NOS as a single subnet. Multiple PeerMaster adapters may be configured to interoperate in various ways, such as:
   Traditional subnets
   One large VNET
   Multiple independent VNETs
   Any combination of VNETs and traditional subnets
All physical segments within a VNET are configured to the same network number. Cross-segment traffic within a VNET is switched by your adapter instead of by your server, allowing the server to be more productive. The server is shielded from the task of routing, which enables the creation of powerful switched, multi-segment, high-bandwidth workgroups or departments. External internetworking devices are not required to provide communication between segments with a VNET.

Guidelines for using the VNET Switch mode:
Do not externally join (using bridges, switches, or concentrators) ports of adapters that comprise a VNET.
Configure as many nodes as needed; the adapter places no limit on the number of nodes per port.
Ensure that all ports in a VNET are bound to the protocol (by way of VNET) with a common network number.



Examples of Configurations
This section describes the following configurations:

Traditional Adapter mode Samples:
An 8-port network with two PeerMaster adapters configured in the Traditional Adapter mode

VNET Switch mode Samples:
An 8-port network with two PeerMaster adapters configured in the VNET Switch mode
An 8-port network with two PeerMaster adapters each configured as an independent VNET
An 8-port network with two PeerMaster adapters, one configured in the VNET Switch mode and the other in the Traditional Adapter mode

Traditional Adapter Mode Configuration

   A server with two Quad-BT PeerMaster adapters configured in the Traditional Adapter mode.
The network protocol views each LAN segment as a separate subnet with its own network number. Clients on all ports have direct access to the server.
Note:  The same principles apply to Quad-B2 configurations; however, concentrator hubs are not required for 10Base2 operation.
 
 

   o A configuration of eight separate network numbers.
   o Curved arrows illustrating the basic flow of cross-subnet traffic. The server-based router accepts and forwards all frames that require routing between subnets.
   o Software layers illustrated above the adapters indicating software that is required to route traffic internally, running on the server.
   o Cross-subnet traffic, such as traffic from Net 1 to Net 2, must be forwarded by a router. The router can be internal to the server or an external stand-alone device.

   The advantage of the Traditional Adapter mode is that a router restricts cross-subnet traffic to only those data packets that are uniquely addressed to the target network. The disadvantage of this mode is that server responsiveness might be heavily impaired due to the burden of packet routing. This mode should be used only when little or no cross-subnet traffic is expected.



VNET Switch Mode Configurations
This section describes three configurations using VNET switch mode.

VNET Switch Mode: Single VNET

   Two Quad-BT PeerMaster adapters (Card 1 and Card 2) forming a single VNET.
In this configuration, the adapter provides the functions of a high-performance network adapter combined with the power of an Ethernet switching hub.

Note:  The same principles apply to Quad-B2 configurations; however, concentrator hubs are not required for 10Base2 operation.
 

   o All segments configured as Network number 1 (Net 1).
   o Curved arrows indicating the flow of data across ports connected by the VNET switch.

   The VNET switch performs all cross-segment traffic and, therefore, server responsiveness is not impaired by heavy cross-segment traffic. The adapters perform two types of frame switching: port-to-port and peer-to-peer.
Type
Occurrence
Example
Port-to-port
When source and destination ports both reside on same adapter.
Adapter forwards data packets between ports 1 and 2 of adapter 1 (Card 1).
Note:  Port-to-port switching is completely transparent to the server microprocessor.
Peer-to-peer
When source and destination ports reside on separate adapters.  Peer-to-peer switching is accomplished through peer data transfers across MicroChannel bus. Adapters forward data packets between port 1 of adapter1 (Card1) and port 1 of adapter 2 (Card 2).

VNET Switch Mode: Multiple VNETs
 
 
 

A configuration of two network numbers (Net 1 and Net 2).
An 8-port network with two Quad-BT PeerMaster adapters (Card 1 and Card 2), each configured as an independent VNET (two VNETs).
Note:  The same principles apply to Quad-B2 configurations; however, concentrator hubs are not required for 10Base2 operation.
The curved arrow that passes through the LAN drivers, protocol stacks, and router in the server represents the connection between the two subnets (Net 1 and Net 2). Cross-subnet traffic, 
such as traffic from Net 1 to Net 2, must be forwarded by a router. The router can be internal to the server or an external stand-alone device.
   Each VNET may represent a separate department or workgroup. The four switched ports within each VNET provide a multisegment workgroup environment. Isolating the two VNETs by way of the server-based router allows you to create a separation between the two departments. You can configure the router to permit restricted traffic to pass between the departments.

VNET  Configuration 3
Note:  Use this configuration only when you expect little or no cross-VNET traffic.

VNET Switch Mode: Combined VNETs and Traditional Nets

This illustration shows:
A five-subnet network (Net 1, Net 2, Net 3, Net 4, and Net 5) configured as one four-segment VNET (VNET1) on Card 1 and four traditional networks on Card 2.
A network using PeerMaster adapters.
Note:  The same principles apply to Quad-B2 configurations; however, hubs are not required for 10Base2 operation. 
Cross-subnet traffic, such as traffic from Net 1 to Net 2, must be forwarded by a router. The router can be internal to the server or an external stand-alone device.
This VNET may represent a large department while the traditional networks may represent small workgroups. You can configure the router to restrict traffic between departments.

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