Configuration

Your system has a special type of memory that maintains an inventory of its features and their associated settings.  This inventory is called the configuration information.  The memory is kept active by a battery, so the configuration information is not lost when the system is turned off.  The battery-backed memory maintains information about:
o Adapters
o Diskette drives
o Memory
o Parallel ports
o SCSI devices
o Serial ports
o Time and date

Subtopics:
Configuration Settings
Configuration Errors
Working with the Configuration Information
        Starting the Set Configuration Program
        Viewing the Configuration
        Changing the Configuration
        Bypassing the System Programs
        Backing Up the Configuration
        Restoring the Configuration
        Running Automatic Configuration
Setting and Viewing SCSI Device Configuration
        Removing a SCSI Device
Enabling the Presence Error Reporting Feature
Disabling the Presence Error Reporting Feature
        Displaying the Memory Map
        Recording Changes

Configuration Settings
   Most built-in features and optional adapters have programmable settings, such as the serial-port and parallel-port assignments.  Each time you turn on the system, the settings are copied from memory to various features to get them ready for operation.  You can change these settings through the system programs.
   Configuration information must be added or changed when optional features are installed.  Some options come with an Option Diskette.  This diskette contains configuration and diagnostic files.  As part of the option-installation procedure, you copy these files to the System Partition, a protected area of your hard disk (non-array models only) or to the backup copy of the Reference Diskette. When you turn on the system, it senses that a new option is installed, displays a configuration error, and asks if you would like to automatically configure the system.  If you respond by pressing Y, the system uses the information from the configuration files to assign settings for the new option that do not conflict with settings for other installed features.  This eliminates the need for you to analyze operating parameters such as interrupt levels and DMA assignments.
   Occasionally, the system might not be able to assign a nonconflicting setting for a new option.  When this happens, the system lets you know that a conflict exists, and that you need to change the setting of another option to resolve the conflict. The system
programs allow you to change the settings through the Set Configuration program.

Configuration Errors
Each time you turn on the system, the power-on self-test (POST) compares the stored configuration information with the installed hardware.  A configuration error can occur under any of the following conditions:
o Adapter or device was added, removed, or moved to different location.
o An external device is not turned on.
o A device is not working correctly, and POST cannot detect its presence.
o Two devices are assigned the same settings (configuration conflict).
If a configuration error is found, an error message, similar to the following, appears on the screen.

Nice Graphic

   For non-array models, if you just added, removed, or changed the location of an option, pressing Y updates the configuration information stored in memory.  If you press N, the system programs Main Menu appears so you can test the system, look at the configuration information to determine the cause of a problem, or change the configuration information to correct a conflict.
   For disk-array models, you will need to insert the Reference Diskette to update or change the configuration information or to test the system.
   If the configuration error is caused by a SCSI device not turned on, not connected, or failing, you are not given the choice to run automatic configuration.  You must press Enter to bypass the error and continue to the Main Menu, where you can either test the
system or check the SCSI device settings.  See Setting and Viewing SCSI Device Configuration for more information.

Working with the Configuration Information
The system programs contain the Set Configuration program, which allows you to work with the configuration information.  This program allows you to perform the following tasks:
o View configuration
o Change configuration
o Back up configuration
o Restore configuration
o Run automatic configuration
o Set and view SCSI device configuration
o Display memory map
You can get online help for each task by pressing F1.

Subtopics:
o Starting the Set Configuration Program
o Viewing the Configuration
o Changing the Configuration
o Bypassing the System Programs
o Backing Up the Configuration
o Restoring the Configuration
o Running Automatic Configuration

Starting the Set Configuration Program
To start the Set Configuration Program:
 1. Start the system programs.
 2. Select Set configuration from the Main Menu.

Nice Graphic

3.  Use the Up Arrow key or the Down Arrow key to highlight the choice; then press Enter.

Viewing the Configuration
By selecting View configuration from the Set Configuration menu, you can see a list of the installed features and their associated settings.  You can get help about any one of the settings by highlighting it and then pressing the F1 key.  The active keys are shown at the bottom of the screen.  (Press F8 to advance to the next screen.)  You cannot make changes from the View Configuration screen.

  Nice Graphic

Changing the Configuration
   By selecting Change configuration from the Set Configuration menu, you can change one or more settings. Some settings are set by the system and cannot be overridden. You can change only those settings enclosed in brackets ([...]) and which have not been set by the system. This screen is the same as View Configuration, except for the active keys shown at the bottom.  (Press F8 to advance to the next screen.)
   Normally, you don't have to change any of the configuration settings because the Automatic Configuration program handles this for you.  Some of the settings deal with the technologies used for each device, and you should be familiar with them before
changing the settings.

Nice Graphic

To change a setting, use the Up Arrow key or the Down Arrow key to highlight one of the bracketed items; then use the F5 and F6 keys to scroll through the list of available choices.  When you are finished making changes, press F10 to save them.  If any setting conflicts with another, an asterisk appears next to the conflicting setting. You must change one of the conflicting settings to a nonconflicting value.

Bypassing the System Programs
You also can change the way your system handles POST errors.  If you don't want the system programs to load when an error occurs during POST, highlight Bypass System Programs on Error and change the Disabled setting to Enabled using the F5 or F6 key.

Backing Up the Configuration
Selecting Backup configuration from the Set Configuration menu copies the configuration information to a file in the System Partition.

Restoring the Configuration
Selecting Restore configuration restores the configuration information from the System Partition to the battery-backed memory. This is useful in case the battery fails or a change you made to the configuration information causes a problem and you need to change it back to the way it was. You can use this feature only if you have previously backed up the configuration.

Running Automatic Configuration
   Selecting Run automatic configuration from the Set Configuration menu resets the configuration information for all installed features to their default settings.  The Automatic Configuration program sets system-board features first, then sets adapters, one at a time, starting with the lowest numbered slot.
Notes:
 1. This program might change the setting of an adapter and cause a memory-address conflict with some application programs and DOS memory managers.  Before using this program, record the current settings on the View Configuration screen, or if you have a printer attached, press the Print Screen key to print a copy of the View Configuration screen.
 2. This program might change the values set by the ServerGuide Performance Tuning utility.  If the values were changed, rerun the tuning utility.

Setting and Viewing SCSI Device Configuration
If you need to know what IDs are being used, or what types of SCSI devices are installed, you can see this information by using the system programs:
Note:  For disk-array models, you can change the RAID configuration settings only from the RAID configuration program.
 1. Turn on the system.  When the F1 prompt appears, press F1.  The system programs Main Menu appears.
    Note:  For disk-array models, insert the Reference Diskette into the primary diskette drive, then turn on the system. Or, if the system is turned on already, insert the Reference Diskette and press Ctrl+Alt+Del.
 2. Select Set configuration from the Main Menu.
 3. Select Set and view SCSI device configuration.

Nice Graphic

   You can change only those settings enclosed by brackets ([...]) and which have not been automatically set by the system.  To get help information about any setting, use the Up Arrow or Down Arrow to highlight your selection; then press F1.
   You can change the SCSI adapter ID; however, other SCSI device IDs are set by the system and cannot be changed from this screen. Most SCSI devices, except adapters and built-in controllers, use jumpers or switches to set the ID. The SCSI IDs for hard disk drives installed in Banks C, D, and E are automatically set by the controller. You can change the ID of a SCSI adapter from the Change Configuration screen or for disk-array models, you can change RAID configuration settings from the RAID Configuration program.

Subtopics:
o Removing a SCSI Device

Removing a SCSI Device
To remove an individual SCSI device permanently:
 1. Turn off the server.
 2. Remove the device.
    Note:  For disk-array models, insert the Reference Diskette now.
 3. Turn on the server.
 4. When error appears, press Enter to bypass error and get to Main Menu.
 5. Select Set configuration from the Main Menu.
 6. Select Set and view SCSI device configuration from the Set Configuration Menu.
 7. Locate the Not present line for the SCSI device you want to remove.
 8. Highlight the Keep setting; then press F5 or F6 to change it to Remove.
 9. Press F10 to save the changed setting.

Enabling the Presence Error Reporting Feature
SCSI devices have a presence error reporting feature that can be set through the Set and View SCSI Device Configuration screen.  This feature works as follows:
o When presence error reporting is set to enabled on a device, POST reports a configuration error if the device is disconnected or turned off.
o When presence error reporting is set to disabled on a device, POST does not check to see if the device is attached or turned on.
   You also have the option of setting presence error reporting on all SCSI devices to disabled. For more information about presence error reporting, see Setting and Viewing SCSI Device Configuration.

Disabling the Presence Error Reporting Feature
If you want to disable presence error reporting on all SCSI devices in your system:
 1. Start the system programs.
 2. Select Set configuration from the Main Menu.
 3. Select Set and view SCSI device configuration from the Set Configuration Menu.
 4. Locate the SCSI Configuration Verification line.
 5. Highlight the Enabled setting; then press F5 or F6 to change it to Disabled.
 6. Press F10 to save the changed setting.

Whether you have disabled the presence error reporting of an individual SCSI device or all SCSI devices in your system, the concept is the same. In the disabled mode, POST does not check to see if the disabled device is attached or turned on.  The configuration information for this device, including the SCSI ID, is kept active in the battery-backed memory.  This feature is convenient if you temporarily disconnect a device, share a device among systems, or use the device occasionally and want the ability to leave it turned off without getting an error message each time you turn on the system.

Subtopics:
o Displaying the Memory Map
o Recording Changes

Displaying the Memory Map
Selecting Display memory map from the Set Configuration menu allows you to view an area of memory normally used as a workspace for adapters. The memory map identifies each device using this space by name and slot number, and shows the addresses being used by that device.  It also shows the amount of unused memory and the addresses available for other purposes, such as memory-manager device drivers.

Recording Changes
Whenever you make changes to the configuration, it's a good practice to record the changes, or print the information that shows the changes. If you have a printer attached, you can print the information from most screens by pressing the Print Screen key. Server Records provides space to keep records. Should the configuration information get lost or changed by accident, your records will help you recover quickly.

System Programs

9595 Main Page